A wonderful Working day in the Neighborhood

Once upon a time, a man named Fred Rogers decided that he wanted to live in heaven. Heaven is the place where good people go when they die, but this man, Fred Rogers, didn’t want to go to heaven; he wanted to live in heaven, here, now, in this world, and so one day, when he was talking about all the people he had loved in this life, he looked at me and said, “The connections we make in the course of a life—maybe that’s what heaven is, Tom.

We make so many connections read more  here on earth. Look at us—I’ve just met you, but I’m investing in who you are and who you will be, and I can’t help it.” Hustlers (2019) Based on The Hustlers at Scores by Jessica Pressler (The Cut, 2015) While evolutionary theory and The Bachelor would suggest that a room full of women hoping to attract the attention of a few men would be cutthroat-competitive, it’s actually better for strippers to work together, because while most men might be able keep their wits, and their wallets, around one scantily clad, sweet-smelling sylph, they tend to lose their grip around three or four. Which is why at Hustler, as elsewhere, the dancers worked in groups. Beautiful Boy (2018) Based on My Addicted Son by David Sheff (The New York Times Magazine, 2005) Nick now claims that he was searching for methamphetamine for his entire life, and when he tried it for the first time, as he says, “That was that.” It would have been no easier to see him strung out on heroin or cocaine, but as every parent of a methamphetamine addict comes to learn, this drug has a unique, horrific quality. In an interview, Stephan Jenkins, the singer in the band Third Eye Blind, said that methamphetamine makes you feel “bright and shiny.” It also makes you paranoid, incoherent and both destructive and pathetically and relentlessly self-destructive. Then you will do unconscionable things in order to feel bright and shiny again.

Nick had always been a sensitive, sagacious, joyful and exceptionally bright child, but on meth he became unrecognizable. Spotlight (2015) Based on a series of reports, starting with Church Allowed Abuse by Priest for Years, by the Boston Globe Spotlight Team (Boston Globe, 2002) For decades, within the US Catholic Church, sexual misbehavior by priests was shrouded in secrecy — at every level. Abusive priests — Geoghan among them — often instructed traumatized youngsters to say nothing about what had been done to them. Parents who learned of the abuse, often wracked by shame, guilt, and denial, tried to forget what the church had done. The few who complained were invariably urged to keep silent. And pastors and bishops, meanwhile, viewed the abuse as a sin for which priests could repent rather than as a compulsion they might be unable to control.

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